Starting point

I’m encouraged lately to pursue my passion. I love taking pictures. But I’m so very insecure about sharing them.

I want to be good! I want to take photos that provoke emotion and awaken senses. I want my focus and exposure to be flawless every time.

But these wants and this quest for perfection are paralyzing me – preventing me from trying. Because if I try, I might fail. And what could be worse than failing?

Never trying at all.

So I’m ready to try; to stop criticizing my work and comparing myself to others. I’m ready to begin the journey; to learn and to stumble and to keep moving forward. Today I’ll be good enough for me. And tomorrow I’ll be better.

So thank you, sweet Husband, for your never-ending encouragement. You’ll always be my favorite model.

And thank you, Kelli, for sharing this on your blog sometime ago.

What Every Aspiring Photographer Should Know

by Cheryl Jacobs Nicolai

– Style is a voice, not a prop or an action. If you can buy it, borrow it, download it, or steal it, it is not a style. Don’t look outward for your style; look inward.

– Know your stuff. Luck is a nice thing, but a terrifying thing to rely on. It’s like money; you only have it when you don’t need it.

– Never apologize for your own sense of beauty. Nobody can tell you what you should love. Do what you do brazenly and unapologetically. You cannot build your sense of aesthetics on a consensus.

– Say no. Say it often. It may be difficult, but you owe it to yourself and your clients. Turn down jobs that don’t fit you, say no to overbooking yourself. You are no good to anyone when you’re stressed and anxious.

– Learn to say “I’m a photographer” out loud with a straight face. If you can’t say it and believe it, you can’t expect anyone else to, either.

– You cannot specialize in everything.

– You don’t have to go into business just because people tell you you should! And you don’t have to be full-time and making an executive income to be successful. If you decide you want to be in business, set your limits before you begin.

– Know your style before you hang out your shingle. If you don’t, your clients will dictate your style to you. That makes you nothing more than a picture taker. Changing your style later will force you to start all over again, and that’s tough.

– Accept critique, but don’t apply it blindly. Just because someone said it does not make it so. Critiques are opinions, nothing more. Consider the advice, consider the perspective of the advice giver, consider your style and what you want to convey in your work. Implement only what makes sense to implement. That doesn’t not make you ungrateful, it makes you independent.

– Leave room for yourself to grow and evolve. It may seem like a good idea to call your business “Precious Chubby Tootsies”….but what happens when you decide you love to photograph seniors? Or boudoir?

– Remember that if your work looks like everyone else’s, there’s no reason for a client to book you instead of someone else. Unless you’re cheaper. And nobody wants to be known as “the cheaper photographer”.

– Gimmicks and merchandise will come and go, but honest photography is never outdated.

– It’s easier to focus on buying that next piece of equipment than it is to accept that you should be able to create great work with what you’ve got. Buying stuff is a convenient and expensive distraction. You need a decent camera, a decent lens, and a light meter. Until you can use those tools consistently and masterfully, don’t spend another dime. Spend money on equipment ONLY when you’ve outgrown your current equipment and you’re being limited by it. There are no magic bullets.

– Learn that people photography is about people, not about photography. Great portraits are a side effect of a strong human connection.

– Never forget why you started taking pictures in the first place. Excellent technique is a great tool, but a terrible end product. The best thing your technique can do is not call attention to itself. Never let your technique upstage your subject.

– Never compare your journey with someone else’s. It’s a marathon with no finish line. Someone else may start out faster than you, may seem to progress more quickly than you, but every runner has his own pace. Your journey is your journey, not a competition. You will never “arrive”. No one ever does.

– Embrace frustration. It pushes you to learn and grow, broadens your horizons and lights a fire under you when your work has gone cold. Nothing is more dangerous to an artist than complacency.

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4 thoughts on “Starting point

  1. Patricia says:

    So, where are the pictures? Please show and share!
    Don’t be afraid. I always feel insecure about my writing. And there are always some people who don’t like it and say so on amazon. But there are many more that do, and it’s worth it!
    Just go out there and have fun.

  2. Julie says:

    Thank you for sharing! Completely can relate to that 🙂 It really is true and it sure is hard NOT to compare yourself to others but remember this: no one is born knowing everything. All must begin somewhere and learn. All those great photographers you admire started just where you are. Best of luck to your beginnings!

  3. Lisa says:

    Your pictures are amazing! I suppose that confidence in your work will come with time and experience, but you definitely have the “eye” for photography! How awesome that you get to align your passion with your career!! x

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